Lets save the world! Aka the Oncology course of Biomedicine BSc program

Molecular Oncology and Statistics might be my favorite course of the Biomedicine BSc program at KI, and I will tell you why. Will I be able to save the world from cancer after doing this course? Perhaps through interdisciplinary research and translational science!

I remember a biology class in high school. My friend had asked the biology teacher to explain what cancer was. To me cancer was this mystical and vicious villain in the world of human health. Too hard for a high school student to understand… I couldn’t have imagined that  3-4 years later I’ll be having an entire course on cancer and a LOOOT more knowledge about it!

This course is one of the few that is organized in collaboration between several Karolinska Institute departments. I find it really cool because I find the interdisciplinary research to have a lot of potential! Plus, it’s one of the two courses that we have on the Karolinska Hospital side (Hospital is across the street from Karolinska Institute), the other course being Genetics at the end of the second year. Being so close to the doctors and patients can feel a bit uncomfortable, but at the same time it makes me think a little – why am I studying biomedicine?

Some people who study biomedicine are just curious about how humans and microorganisms work. But for those who believe that their future biomedical discoveries will save the world, it can be really reassuring and encouraging to be among the hospital buildings where the newest treatment methods are being put in practice.

In addition to this, just imagine what discoveries will be possible to be made once the New Karolinska Hospital and Biomedicum are done! In a few years there will be a bridge between the Karolinska Institute and the Hospital, symbolizing also the better bridging of research and medical care!

 

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Illustration presented at the eHealth Week 2016

The whole Oncology course feels like learning translational science*. We have lectures on the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer, but at the same time we meet the patients at the “patient demos”. We listen to the patient together with their doctor tell us about the treatment process and the experience of fighting cancer.

 

This course has managed well to raise my interest in translational medicine and I find it exciting to be able to observe the cancer cell development during our course lab!

I hope that you now know what translational research is and you’re wishing you could also do the Molecular Oncology course! 😉

Thanks for reading!

*Translational science, also called the translational research, “translates” the basic research into medical practice. It’s aim is to enhance the human health and well-being.

 

Read more about the Future Projects of Karolinska in my previous post.

Cover photo designed by Kjpargeter / Freepik

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